Producing Audio Slideshows with Final Cut Pro


One of a Kind in the World Museum

In 2005, Joe Weiss released Soundslides, a killer audio slideshow production program that helped transition many newspaper photojournalists into the world of online multimedia. Audio slideshows soon flooded newspaper websites. Its simple interface and even simpler learning curve proved a perfect match for anyone wanting to add an audio narrative to their online picture stories.

But times have changed. Many of those same photojournalists moved on to add video to their storytelling toolboxes. As they began to master video editing programs like Apple’s Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premiere Pro, it seemed like a no brainer to use them to produce audioslide shows. I cannot say building an audio slideshow is easier with a video editing program, but it does afford you some added features that are hard, if not impossible, to replicate in Soundslides.

Here are some of the things I’ve learned when making an audio slideshow using Apple’s Final Cut Pro:

  • Soundslides is great at taking all the tedious production out of the process. It grabs all your photos in a file and automatically sizes them for the web. When producing in a video editor, you have to do all this image prep yourself. But it’s not too bad if you create a Photoshop action to automate the process.  I create a one-click action to reduce the image dpi to 72 and size to each photo to a width of 2500 pixels. This size makes the images large enough to use motion on later if needed.
  • Before you start to edit, it is important to set up your timeline as an HD project. It makes the photos look so much better, even after you compress the hell out of them later for the web. I generally pick Apple Intermediate Codec 720p30 from the “Easy Setup” menu. I think progressive timelines without the interlacing work best for photos. I’ve even used the XDCAM 1080p30 setting with great results.
  • As I assemble my story, I tend to build as I go. I start editing at the beginning with audio, then layer on my photos. I use the voiceover tool in Final Cut Pro to record my script narrative direct to the timeline. This is just how I do it. There are many ways to edit. You may like to have the whole project storyboarded out before you start your edit. Do whatever works best for you.
  • I try to scale up each photo to fill my Canvas viewer. This looks so much better than having black bars showing above and below the image.
  • One of the nice things about producing audio slideshows in a video editor is the ability to display multiple photos at once in the Canvas viewer. This solves the vertical photo issue of trying fill a horizontal space with a vertical rectangle. I like to fade in my vertical photos on the far left or right of my frame then fade in another image to fill the rest of the frame. Click image below to see and example of using multiple photos in one window.

 

Mount St. Helens comes to town

  • In Soundslides the default is to add a cross-fade to every image. I see a trend away from this as more people edit in video programs.  Most of the time I just use quick cut between photos. It took me awhile to break the cross fade habit, but now I see how much better a show flows without all that cross fading. It also makes it easier to edit to a beat in the audio.
  • I tend to edit an audio slide show like I edit a video story. I try to use sequences of images that help move the story through time and place. I try to mix up the photo selection by using a mix of wide, medium and tight shots just like I do with video.
  • Use motion on photos with caution. Most of the time, slower is better. You don’t want to make the viewer seasick. Try not to zigzag all over the place. Use motion on a photo to reveal or isolate something that pertains to the story. I like to put a very slow pull or push on a photo that is almost not noticeable. It adds just a little kick to a static photo. One last suggestion on using motion with photos; If you are pulling out on a photo and your next image has motion too, make that one zoom in; otherwise it makes the viewer feel like they are heading through a tunnel.
  • Finally, the other added benefit of producing audio slide shows in a video editor is that it brings all your multimedia under one player for your website. If your video player has embed ability, it makes it easier for viewers to share your story and make it go viral.
About these ads

12 thoughts on “Producing Audio Slideshows with Final Cut Pro

  1. Pingback: Producing Audio Slideshows with Final Cut Pro | Mastering Multimedia « multibedia

  2. I agree a lot with your points. Also with the point: “Use motion on photos with caution”.

    But when I watched your beautiful slideshow about Mount St. Helen I’ve seen a lot of slow zoom ins. Which use do they have? My opinion is that you have to have a good reason for zooming. Normally if you want to focus on a point of the photo. Fighting against the fear that the story is too stiff is a bad reason. Also a bad reason is to move a story with moving the pictures.

  3. Pingback: Canberra Canary

  4. Pingback: Friday Fast Five + Five | NABJdigital Blog

  5. Pingback: » MCOM 407: Improving Photo Composition » Blog Archive

  6. Pingback: Producing Audio Slideshows with Final Cut Pro « JRN 423 Online Visual Storytelling

  7. Pingback: Compressing Files in FCP and uploading to Vimeo « Multimedia Storytelling

  8. I use Adobe Premier Pro for my slideshows although it feels like an over kill, I find it more liberating especially when syncing audio and controlling visual effects such as zooms.

  9. I didn’t think to use Final Cut for audio until I attempted to edit a colleague’s footage. Somehow, she’d managed to record the interview (using a HD video recorder) sideways, so the poor interviewee looked like she was lying on her side. We salvaged it by stripping back and just using the audio in the end, which worked fine, and it was nice and clean to edit in Final Cut. Must try it for audio slideshows next…

Comments are closed.